Saturday, March 9, 2013

Monkey Business Combo Pack

I had so much fun using my Monkey Business cards for /sh/ this week, and I got so much great feedback from many of you that I made a combo pack for R, S, and L and Blends!

This pack includes 27 pages of cute monkey cards organized into three sets:  R/ R-Blends, S/ S-Blends, and L/L-Blends.








Each set features its own distinct colored frame around the target words, and a symbol indicating the position of the target sound.  The R/R-blend set contains 8 initial position, 8 medial position, 16 final position, 32 blends and 8 blank cards.


 The S/S-Blend set contains 8 initial, 8 medial, 8 final, 24 blends and 8 blank cards.


The L/L-Blend set contains 8 initial, 8 medial, 8 final, 16 blends and 8 blank cards.  Each set also contains a banana page to record answers.


I'm finding this activity to be really helpful for transitioning to using these sounds in spontaneous speech.  It's also a great language activity, because the students need to name 5 items in a category or talk about 5 features of an object.  Who doesn't love an activity that hits both speech AND language???

You can find this combo pack at my TpT site.  If you download it, please leave feedback!


Enjoy!

Pam

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Monkey Business: A Carryover Activity for /sh/

I've got a FREEBIE for you today:

 It's called Monkey Business:  an Activity for Articulation Carryover of /SH/.

As I've mentioned before, carryover of speech sounds is one of the most difficult tasks we SLP's face.  Our kids are pros at correctly producing sounds in drill activities, but have so much difficulty making that leap to using them correctly in conversation.

I was reviewing notes from a continuing ed course by Pam Marshalla on Frontal Lisp/Lateral Lisp, and something she said jumped out at me:  kids need lots of practice with rote sequences in order to learn the motor movement sequences required in conversational speech.  I realized that I'd been missing that key step with some of my kids, so this little activity was born.


 This is what I did.  I printed off a stack of cards that featured the /sh/ sound in the initial position of words, cut them out and put them in a stack.  I gave my student one of these:


 He read the top card on the stack, which gave him instructions to name or tell 5 things about a word that contained the /sh/ using a carrier phrase.  He wrote his first answer on the banana sheet, in a box after the number 1 and then said a complete sentence, using the carrier phrase and his response.  He repeated the sequence for the other 4 answers.  Then, he stated all 5 phrases in rapid succession.

I'll give you an example of what that looked like.  The card he chose said, "Name 5 things you can SHAKE.  Start each sentence with "I can shake..."  He said, "I can shake a can" and wrote "can" in a box on the banana sheet.  Next he said, "I can shake a stick." and wrote "stick" below "can" on the banana sheet.  He repeated this sequence 3 more times.  Then, he said, "I can shake a stick, I can shake a can, I can shake..." until he listed all 5.  Then, we turned over a new card, and repeated the sequence for the remaining 7 cards.

I also made cards for the medial position:


...and the final position.


Does this seem like it might be helpful for you?  You can find this FREEBIE on my TpT site right here.  If you download it, please leave some feedback so I'll know if you find it useful.


Pam